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Association Between Food Specific IgG Antibodies with Clinical Activity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

Background and aim: Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disease that is influenced by food, an important factor in accelerating its clinical disease activity because of intestinal inflammation trough formation of antigen-antibody complex. Food-specific IgG examination can identify the types of person foods consumes that are maybe responsible for disease activity. It is useful in treating IBD without risking malnourishment as it is tailored to the individual immune profile. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving 113 patients diagnosed with IBD by colonoscopy. Examination of serum IgG specific for 220 types of foods was performed using ELISA and immuno-array techniques. Disease clinical activity was assessed using the Mayo Index and Crohn Disease Activity Index. Results: The highest proportion of dietary IgG in Chron’s disease was peas (100%), barley (97.9%), eggs (95.9%), milk (81.6%), and corn (75.5%); while in ulcerative colitis it was barley (98.4%), peas (96.8%), egg whites (92.2%), corn (82.8%), and prunes (78.1%). In ulcerative colitis, there was a weak negative correlation between cashew nuts IgG (r = -0.347, p=0.041) and chickpeas IgG (r =-0.473, p=0.017) with clinical disease activity; while in Chron’s disease, a weak positive correlation with disease activity was seen in barley (r = 0.261, p = 0.042). Conclusion: There was a weak negative correlation between cashew and chickpea-specific IgG antibodies with clinical activity of ulcerative colitis, and a weak positive correlation between barley-specific IgG antibodies and Chron’s disease clinical activity.

Food-Specific IgG Antibodies, Clinical Disease Activity, IBD

APA Style

Parhusip Santi, Rengganis Iris, Simadibrata Marcellus, Abdullah Murdani, Shatri Hamzah, et al. (2023). Association Between Food Specific IgG Antibodies with Clinical Activity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Gastroenterology, 7(1), 32-39. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijg.20230701.15

ACS Style

Parhusip Santi; Rengganis Iris; Simadibrata Marcellus; Abdullah Murdani; Shatri Hamzah, et al. Association Between Food Specific IgG Antibodies with Clinical Activity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Gastroenterol. 2023, 7(1), 32-39. doi: 10.11648/j.ijg.20230701.15

AMA Style

Parhusip Santi, Rengganis Iris, Simadibrata Marcellus, Abdullah Murdani, Shatri Hamzah, et al. Association Between Food Specific IgG Antibodies with Clinical Activity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int J Gastroenterol. 2023;7(1):32-39. doi: 10.11648/j.ijg.20230701.15

Copyright © 2023 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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